Pinkbike Awards 2021: Nominees for Value Mountain Bike of the Year

Nominated for Mountain Bike of the Year

If you’re into cars, you might like the exotic last million dollar videos thrown sideways across the track before listening intently to the reviewer talk about the interior fabrics and how you’ve got a 220-degree blind spot behind you. If you like history, you could read about Egypt, Rome, or maybe you dream about Sumer and the theories of the Anunnaki. If food is more your thing, maybe you never miss a Top Chef and your dreams include a $ 20,000 Bertazzoni gas stove to make your grilled cheeses. But here in the real world most of our cars are rusty, we probably won’t be going to the Middle East anytime soon, and I certainly don’t need an expensive stove to burn another grilled cheese for the three hundredth time.

Expensive bikes are great, sure, but we all know you sure don’t need a $ 10,000 carbon fiber thing to have fun. Quite the opposite, in fact, with brands now offering an incredible amount of capability in packages that cost a third (or less) of the premium versions but, in many cases, deliver 95% of the performance. The Devinci Marshal, the Ibis Ripley AF, the BMC Twostroke AL ​​One and the Polygon Siskiu T8 were all at the 2021 Value Bike Field Trip series, while Kazimer spent time on the Vitus scarp earlier in 2021 , and all five are our nominees for Value Mountain Bike of the Year.

Which one do you think makes the most sense?


Why he is nominated

The Devinci Marshall 29 Deore 12S is an aluminum trail bike with 130mm of travel, 140mm fork and priced at US $ 2,299 although it was welded in the Devinci factory just north of Quebec City. . His Canadian DNA might be important to some of us, but it wouldn’t matter if the bike didn’t perform well. Fortunately, the Marshall is an easy to ride and versatile machine that should feel right at home in all kinds of terrain; its decent pedaling manners hide its weight and make the most of tame singletracks, while the Split Pivot rear suspension also impresses on descents.

No, it’s not the fastest of the bunch on the climbs or descents, but you can think of the Marshall as more of a rugged all-rounder on a budget than a value-conscious specialist.

FULL REVIEW


Why he is nominated

The Ripley isn’t a new name, but it’s a brand new bike for 2021. The Ibis 120mm travel trail bike has always been a light-footed machine for people who like to pedal. strong, like light weight and like carbon fiber. . Now the new AF aluminum version costs less while weighing more, but still manages to retain the efficient and precise nature for which the more expensive carbon models have always been known. There’s also a revised dw link suspension layout designed to improve frame stiffness, along with chain guide tabs and all the other must-haves, but it’s the longer and looser geometry that is by far the go-to. more important – it is a degree more relaxed than the carbon bike.

The result on the trail is a bike that still rewards your pedaling efforts, but is also more rewarding on difficult descents while costing less.

FULL REVIEW


Why he is nominated

Yes, $ 4,200 is a lot of money no matter how you slice it up, but Vitus manages to put a hell of a punch in the price of the 29 CRX Escarpe. Undoubtedly helped by their direct-to-consumer model, you get a new carbon front triangle, factory-level Fox 36 fork and DPS shock, Shimano’s XT 12-speed drivetrain and brakes, a DT wheelset. Swiss XM1700 and even a Maxxis Assegai / Dissector tire combo which should probably all add up to more than what Vitus asks for the rather handsome Escarpe.

More important than all of that, Kazimer liked the way he performed on the track, saying that “… offers value for money that’s hard to beat, with track manners that make it a worthy option for a huge range of riding locations.

FULL REVIEW


Why he is nominated

One of the best ways to save more than a few dollars on your new mountain bike is to find one that trades in the rear shock for a lower price, much like BMC’s new hardtail mountain bike. Designed to be an entry into cross country and racing, the Twostroke aluminum frame sports a bunch of interesting details and feels quick when stationary. Most notably, while it may be aluminum rather than carbon, the frame is more than nice enough to accommodate your lighter (and more expensive) upgrades if and when you get bitten by the cross country racing bug. -country. And sure, the geometry doesn’t look that aggressive next to something meant for spicier trails, but the Twostroke is actually longer and looser than many other race bikes on the market.

While obviously not for trail runners who like to test themselves on rough terrain, the Twostroke could be a great gateway to your future as a cross country runner.

FULL REVIEW


Why he is nominated

It’s always nice when your relatively inexpensive mountain bike seems to cost a lot more than it actually does, which is the case with Polygon’s $ 2,369 USD Siskiu T8. Undoubtedly helped by the purple, black and glossy paint job, I would say the Siskiu aluminum handles just that while delivering impressive performance on the track. The geometry numbers are in the range of what you’d like to see for a trail bike, but it’s the active suspension that seems to set the Polygon apart from the rest at this price point. Once you have the climb behind you the fork and rear suspension smooths out roots and rocks and everything in between better than anything at this price point should be able to do that.

The original review was titled ‘Polygon’s $ 2,369 Siskiu makes you think it’s more expensive,‘which pretty much sums up everything you need to know about this bike.

FULL REVIEW





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Wiley C. Thompson