New bike given to NorCal boy with cerebral palsy after custom stolen

The community has come together to help an 11-year-old Sacramento boy with cerebral palsy after his specialized therapy bike was stolen. Korrie Erickson made a public appeal in April, asking for help in finding her stolen bike. Her mother, April Witt, said the bike was stolen in March from Korrie’s school, Earl Warren Elementary School. Korrie had obtained it last summer from the Shriners Hospital in Sacramento as a donation. “As a little kid, as a kid in a wheelchair, a lot of the bikes in the world, they’re for walking kids,” Korrie said. Her mother said Korrie couldn’t ride a conventional bicycle because he has cerebral palsy, which affects his ability to balance and walk. “That’s the only thing that made him feel normal. Instead of using a wheelchair, he has a bike. He’s like, ‘Hey mom, let’s go,'” Witt said. The family shared their story with KCRA 3 in April. Then the community stepped in to help, raising more than $3,000 to give Korrie a new bike, even a lock, helmet, and bike rack for the car for easy transportation. Bikehaus, a bike shop in Elk Grove, helped coordinate the effort “We had about 30 people who donated ranging from $50 to $1,100. We had a pretty wide range of donations, but it was truly a community effort,” said Ryan Polli, co-owner of Bikehaus. The store ordered and assembled the bike. “Yeah, to see him smiling and happy, to know that he can go back out there and ride and have a bit of his own independence again, is awesome,” Polli said. They are still working on some final tweaks on the custom bike to make sure Korrie will be back soon. “Thank you to everyone who helped with this project. You put another smile on my son’s face,” Witt said. negativity in the world right now, it’s more important than ever to reach out and help out with our community wherever possible,” Polli said. “It can be a big effort, it can be a small effort. We at Bikehaus are grateful to have had the opportunity to be part of this one.” The stolen bike was returned to school last month, but it was damaged and Korrie couldn’t ride it, according to her mother. Sacramento police said they are still investigating who stole the bike and have not identified who returned it to the school.

The community has come together to help an 11-year-old Sacramento boy with cerebral palsy after his specialized therapy bike was stolen.

Korrie Erickson made a public appeal in April, asking for help in finding her stolen bike. Her mother, April Witt, said the bike was stolen in March from Korrie’s school, Earl Warren Elementary School.

Korrie had obtained it last summer from the Shriners Hospital in Sacramento as a donation.

“As a little kid, as a kid in a wheelchair, a lot of the bikes in the world, they’re for walking kids,” Korrie said.

Her mother said Korrie could not ride a conventional bicycle because he suffered from cerebral palsy, which affected his ability to balance and walk.

“That’s the only thing that made him feel normal. Instead of using a wheelchair, he has a bike. He’s like, ‘Hey mom, let’s go,'” Witt said.

The family shared their story with KCRA 3 in April. Then the community stepped in to help, raising more than $3,000 to give Korrie a new bike, even a lock, helmet, and bike rack for the car for easy transportation.

Bikehaus, a bike shop in Elk Grove, helped coordinate the efforts.

“We had about 30 people who donated anywhere from $50 to $1,100. We had a pretty wide range of donations, but it was very much a community effort,” said Ryan Polli, co-owner of Bikehaus.

The store ordered and assembled the bike.

“Yeah, to see him smiling and happy, to know that he can go back out there and ride and have a bit of his own independence again, is awesome,” Polli said.

They are still working on some final tweaks to the custom bike to make sure Korrie will be on the go again soon.

“Thank you to everyone who helped with this project. You put another smile on my son’s face,” Witt said.

Bikehaus hopes this will inspire more acts of kindness.

“With all the negativity in the world right now, it’s more important than ever to reach out and help your community where you can,” Polli said. “It can be a big effort, it can be a small effort. We at Bikehaus are grateful to have had the opportunity to be part of this one.”

The stolen bike was returned to school last month, but it was damaged and Korrie couldn’t ride it, according to her mother.

Sacramento police said they are still investigating who stole the bike and have not identified who returned it to the school.

Wiley C. Thompson